Faridabad Medical Centre

Faridabad Medical Centre Faridabad medical centre is an children medicare hospital with all facilities available for childrens,we are persuing with a moto of providing the best children cooperative medical centre at affordable prices ,so that poor can also afford it.
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Faridabad medical centre is an children medicare hospital with all facilities available for childrens,we are persuing with a moto of providing the best children cooperative medical centre at affordable prices ,so that poor can also afford it.

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The Difference Between Consequences and Punishments for Kids
The discipline children receive for misbehavior impacts the likelihood of whether or not that behavior will occur again. Discipline also impacts children’s self-esteem, the relationship with their caregiver, and their view of the world around them. Understanding the difference between a punishment and a consequence can help you establish effective discipline strategies.
The Danger of Punishments
Punishments are not logical or natural.They tend to make kids feel bad. For example, if a child doesn’t do his homework, a punishment may include having to go to bed three hours early. Going to bed early and not doing his homework are not related. In essence, “the punishment doesn’t fit the crime.” A punishment like this isn’t going to lead to your child getting his homework done and instead, is likely to create relationship problems between you and your child.
There's a difference between discipline and punishment.Punishments often defeat the purpose of discipline. Discipline should be used as a way to teach children how to manage their behaviors and learn from mistakes. When punishment is used as adiscipline technique, it tends to make children focus on their anger toward their parents, rather than their own behaviors. This is counter-productive as it can result in children thinking “My mom is mean” rather than “I made a mistake.” Punishments are often given out of anger, may be overly exaggerated, and may be very critical of the child.
The Benefits of Consequences
Positive and negative consequences teach children to how to make healthy decisions on their own. They allow for an opportunity to learn from mistakes and to take responsibility for their own behaviors. Consequences can either be natural or logical and they provide an opportunity for learning.
Natural Consequences
Natural consequences are the consequences that are a direct result of a child’s behaviors. For example, if a child jumps in mud puddles, his shoes will be wet. Or if a child refuses to eat all of his lunch, he will be hungry in time for dinner. Allowing for natural consequences allows children to learn first-hand about what results from their behaviors.
Natural consequences can be offered when the consequence is safe. For example, you wouldn’t want to allow a child to touch a hot stove and receive the natural consequence of a serious burned. However, allowing your child to experience some discomfort, such as feeling cold when he refuses to wear a jacket on a cool day, may be helpful to his learning.
It’s also important to examine your child’s development to make sure natural consequences are an age appropriate discipline. Natural consequences work best for older children who can understand the direct link between their behaviors and the consequences. In order to benefit, they need to have the ability to use that information when making future decisions.
Logical Consequences
Logical consequences are those consequences that are a direct result from the child’s behavior. For example, if your child rides his bike outside of the yard, then a logical consequence would mean that he loses his bicycle privileges for the rest of the night. Instead of grounding him from video games or something unrelated to the misbehavior, a logical consequence is directly linked.
Logical consequences help children learn from their mistakes. For example, the child who loses his bike for riding it outside the yard will likely remember what caused him to lose his bicycle riding privilege. In contrast, if a child loses his video game time for riding his bike out of the yard, a few hours later he may not even recall why he received the consequence.
There are several things parents can do to make logical consequences more effective. For example, offer the consequence immediately following the misbehavior when possible. For example, if a child hits his brother at breakfast, telling him he will have an early bedtime isn’t likely to be effective. Also, make sure there is a clear time table for how long a privilege is lost. If you tell a child he’s lost his video game privileges indefinitely, he’ll lose motivation to earn it back. Usually 24 hours is an effective time frame.

   Over a month ago
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   Over a month ago
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Hand-washing:What to Do and how to do?
Hand-washing is an easy way to prevent infection. Understand when to wash your hands, how to properly use hand sanitizer and how to get your children into the habit.
Frequent hand-washing is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick and spreading illness. Hand-washing requires only soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer — a cleanser that doesn't require water.
How to wash your hands?

When to wash your hands
As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. In turn, you can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Although it's impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes.
Always wash your hands before:
• Preparing food or eating
• Treating wounds, giving medicine, or caring for a sick or injured person
• Inserting or removing contact lenses
Always wash your hands after:
• Preparing food, especially raw meat or poultry
• Using the toilet or changing a diaper
• Touching an animal or animal toys, leashes or waste
• Blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing into your hands
• Treating wounds or caring for a sick or injured person
• Handling garbage, household or garden chemicals, or anything that could be contaminated — such as a cleaning cloth or soiled shoes
• Shaking hands with others
In addition, wash your hands whenever they look dirty.
Kids need clean hands, too
Help children stay healthy by encouraging them to wash their hands properly and frequently. Wash your hands with your child to show him or her how it's done. To prevent rushing, suggest washing hands for as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song twice. If your child can't reach the sink on his or her own, keep a step stool handy.
Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are OK for children and adolescents, especially when soap and water aren't available. However, be sure to supervise young children using alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Remind your child to make sure the sanitizer completely dries before he or she touches anything. Store the container safely away after use.
Hand hygiene is especially important for children in child care settings. Young children cared for in groups outside the home are at greater risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, which can easily spread to family members and other contacts.
Be sure your child care provider promotes frequent hand-washing or use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Ask whether the children are required to wash their hands several times a day — not just before meals. Note, too, whether diapering areas are cleaned after each use and whether eating and diapering areas are well-separated.
A simple way to stay healthy
Hand-washing doesn't take much time or effort, but it offers great rewards in terms of preventing illness. Adopting this simple habit can play a major role in protecting your health.

   Over a month ago
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Punishments vs. Consequences: Which Are You Using?
Do these situations sound familiar? Your 10-year-old won’t listen to you when you tell her to come inside for dinner. You rack your brain for a way to change this behavior so that in the future she will do as you ask. Your teenager breaks curfew – again. You thought you had addressed this with him the last time he got home late, but here you go again. As parents, we know the importance of parenting from our principles, things like teaching our children to own up to their actions and face the fallout when they make poor choices. And you’ve tried. You’ve talked to your child over and over, you’ve explained your reasoning repeatedly. You’ve given them restrictions, taken things away and grounded them for a month. Yet nothing seems to be getting through. It could be time to look at the difference between punishing your child and using consequences.
“Consequences help all of us learn and grow. When kids experience the effects of their actions, they get the chance to learn from their mistakes, make better choices and improve their behaviors.”
What Are Consequences?
Consequences are things that flow naturally from one’s choices, actions and decisions. There can be “bad” and “good” natural consequences. If you overeat, the consequence can be a stomach ache. But if you are kind to someone, they’ll likely be kind in return. Consequences help all of us learn and grow. When kids experience the effects of their actions, they get the chance to learn from their mistakes, make better choices and improve their behaviors. Consequences also give us the chance to parent from our principles instead of from a place of frustration, anger or disappointment.

Consequences Are Different from Punishments
Punishment says to your child: you’d better think like me, or else. If you don’t, I will make you pay (or suffer) until you make the choice I want you to make. A punishment doesn’t respect the child’s right to make a decision, even if that decision is a poor one. It arises out of anger and fear and often looks like a withdrawal of love in order to get the child to do what you want them to do. This approach doesn’t help kids develop new ways of taking responsibility for their behavior. It can also be destructive to the relationship.
Consequences, on the other hand, communicate to your child that their behavior is their choice and their responsibility. And that your responsibility is to help them learn how to face the results of their choices, no matter how difficult or unpleasant. A consequence respects the child’s right to make a decision, even if it’s not a good one. It’s not a withdrawal of love or a rejection. It’s a matter-of-fact learning experience in which you maintain a better relationship with the child as you hold them accountable.
Let’s look at a common situation to illustrate how providing consequences is different from delivering punishment. Your 13-year-old doesn’t call to check-in and let you know where he is. In the past, his punishment was to lose his cell phone for a couple of days. Yes, that might have taught him that when you don’t act responsibly you can lose privileges. But what it didn’t teach him is how to act more responsibly. So how can using consequences make a difference here?
Take the same scenario, but before you decide how to respond first ask yourself: What is it that I want him to learn and improve? You probably want him to learn to follow your instructions and do what he is told, which in this case was to call. You also want him to improve by consistently remembering to do it. To motivate and guide your son to better behaviors, the consequence could be that he will only be allowed to go out with friends on the coming weekend and only for an hour. During that time he must remember to call you and let you know where he is. If he does this successfully both Saturday and Sunday, he can return to going out for longer periods of time. What he’s learning is that privilege (going out with friends) comes with responsibility (calling to check-in). What he’s getting is the chance to practice and demonstrate to you both is that he can be trusted to do as he’s supposed to.
Or maybe your daughter doesn’t do her assigned chores. What do you want her to learn and practice? A natural consequence may be that you do not feel the goodwill to take her shopping. Instead, she is assigned extra jobs to help you out around the house. From this she learns that when she doesn’t do her part, others may not have the time or interest to go out of their way for her. Having to help more around the house will let her practice doing her part and to appreciate that not meeting her responsibilities can cause problems for others.
It’s Not Working!
Of course, consequences are only effective if your child buys in and decides to change. It can be frustrating to hear that, but ultimately their behavior is up to them. Maybe your son will eventually get tired of not having his cell phone and decide he’d rather check-in on schedule. Maybe. That’s up to him. Your job is to consistently hold him accountable through consequences, whether or not he decides to change.
It’s easy when you are feeling exasperated with your child to resort to doing things like using increasingly extreme consequences, attempting to control him or her through anger or distance, or just giving up. Resist that temptation! It can help to keep in mind the underlying reason why you are trying so hard–you genuinely want to help guide your child. By showing your child what they can expect in life when they make poor choices, the consequences are working, regardless of how your child responds. Whether or not your child’s behavior changes is their choice. Your responsibility is to keep reality front and center, whether your child cares to see it or not.
Tips for Creating Effective Consequences
• Pause and be thoughtful – In order to provide consequences that help your child learn, take your time thinking it through. Tell your child you will get back to him or her as to what the consequence will be. Think about what it is that you hope he or she will learn. What is your goal?
• Be consistent – You can’t make your child change, but you can make sure you consistently provide consequences when you see him or her making poor choices. Stick to it, despite any opposition, unhappiness or lack of noticeable change in behavior.
• Be mindful – Stay focused on you doing your job and let your child do his or hers. Your job is to guide your child by providing reasonable and realistic consequences. Your child’s job is to decide how he or she will respond to what you provide and expect.
• Be matter of fact – Think of providing consequences like conducting a business deal. It’s about facts, not emotions. Don’t take their behavior personally, which is hard, I know. Yelling, cajoling, criticizing and nagging won’t work over the long run and will only get you more frustrated and upset. Focus on how you are going to behave, no matter how they act.
• Accept your limits – When we accept that we can’t make our children behave a certain way, we actually have a greater chance of successfully influencing their behavior. When our children don’t have to use their energy to get us off their back, they will have a clearer mind, less anxiety and be better able to make reasonable decisions. Remember that the consequences that you consistently hand them will help positively shape them.
• Use “I” not “You” Statements - Taking an “I” position is better than taking a “You” position when it comes to providing consequences. Children respond better when they know where their parents stand on an issue rather than when they are being bossed. For example, saying “I will not listen when you speak to me like that” delivers a clearer message about what is acceptable than “You had better stop speaking to me like that.”
Punishments send a message to children that sounds like this: “If you think for yourself and not like me, you will have a price to pay.” This, of course, contradicts what most parents actually want for their children, which is to raise them to be independent and think for themselves. Consistent and reasonable consequences can help you to develop children who can function independently, think for themselves, and make good choices throughout their lives.



   Over a month ago
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Ages & Stages
Children go through distinct periods of development as they move from infants to young adults. During each of these stages multiple changes in the development of the brain are taking place. What occurs and approximately when these developments take place are genetically determined. However, environmental circumstances and exchanges with key individuals within that environment have significant influence on how each child benefits from each developmental event.
Ages and Stages is a term used to broadly outline key periods in the human development timeline. During each stage growth and development occur in the primary developmental domains including physical, intellectual, language and social – emotional. Our goal is to help parents understand what is taking place in their child’s brain and body during each period with the hope that they will be able to provide the necessary support, encouragement, structure and interventions to enable a child to progress through each stage as easily and successfully as possible based on each child’s unique set of traits and interests.
Infants/Babies (0 – 2 years) Raising a baby, especially for the first time, is both exciting and challenging. This is a time for developing the bonds that will last a lifetime providing the child with the inner resources to develop self-esteem and the ability to relate positively with others. It is also the time for parents to begin to discover who this new person really is. Each child is unique and it is imperative that parents learn to understand, respect, support and encourage the unique characteristics and abilities of each child.
Toddlers/Preschoolers (2 – 5 years)
When a child takes the first step on his or her own, a new phase in development begins. At this stage children are now free to roam around their world. It is a time for active exploration of their environment. Language development takes major leaps which leads to learning the names of objects of interest, the ability to ask for things and as they discover their independent nature, yes, they develop the ability to say “NO!”.
During this developmental stage, a major challenge is developing what psychologists call emotional regulation. “Meltdowns” are common during this period but parents can use the bond developed during infancy to help the child learn to modulate their emotional expression and begin to grasp the difficult concept of delay of gratification. While they instinctively seem to be able to say “NO” toddlers also need help in learning how to accept “No” from others.
This is also a stage of rapid physical and intellectual development preparing these children for starting school which includes interacting cooperatively with peers while at the same time being able to compete physically and intellectually. A child’s parent is in the position to be a coach providing just the right combination of encouragement, support and guidance. Parents also need to serve as primary teacher for the mastery of basic learning skills and encourage active discussion and experimentation of new concepts and skills.
School Age Children (6 – 12 years)
Raising school age children can be awesome. Watching them try new activities, cheering them on at athletic events and applauding their accomplishments at recitals are usually some of the high points for most parents. However, achieving success is often preceded with frustration and sometimes learning to accept one’s weaknesses as well as celebrating and building on strengths. When will equipped parents can be excellent coaches for their child no matter what the endeavor.
While toddlers and preschoolers need constant supervision, school age children become gradually ready for more independence. However, learning to make good choices and exercise self-discipline does not come easily for many. Parents need to impart a moral code that the child gradually internalizes. As children struggle with these important tasks parents must be able to provide praise and encouragement for achievement but parents must also be able to allow them to sometimes experience the natural consequences for their behavior or provide logical consequences to help them learn from mistakes.
Adolescents/Teenagers (13 – 18 years)
There is no doubt that for most families, the teen years present a challenge for both parents and children.
Middle School is not fondly remembered by most who attend. It is often fraught with scary body changes, bullying by peers and a new surge for independence. This leads to passive-aggressive behavior (“I’ll do it in a minute”), self-consciousness (“What are you staring at?”) and self-doubt (“I’m not good at anything.”) and/or over-confidence (“Well, I thought I could do that.”) and of course moodiness (“Leave me alone.”).
High School is usually better for most. It is a time to really begin defining one’s self and realistically contemplating the future. Skill development is accelerated to prepare for college or job training programs. Talents are perfected. Social skills are honed and relationships take on more of a serious nature. Peer pressure is at its max and in today’s teen society there are more tempting sidetracks than ever.
During adolescence, kids need their parents more than ever. Research shows that a positive family environment including fun family activities, open parent-child communication and the encouragement to participate in positive extracurricular and community activities, teens are able to navigate these years with relative ease.

   Over a month ago
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